The Death Of Nintendo Power

The Death Of Nintendo Power

Nintendo Power was the first gaming magazine that I was introduced to in my youth. It was released in 1988, with a depiction of Mario running away from a froggy King Wart. This one magazine introduced me to a world of codes, cheats, and information.

 

I bought Super Mario Bros. 2 because of this Nintendo Power issue. Back then, me, my cousins, and my brother, couldn’t believe how “cartoony” the pixels were! It was the closest thing we’d ever get to playing a Saturday morning show on our NES. The graphics blew me away.

 

Nintendo Power First Issue Mario

 

I also remember Nintendo Power’s fold out map of Hyrule. This gaming poster is the one and only reason I ever beat The Legend of Zelda. Without the helpful tips of Nintendo Power, I never would have found the silver arrow, broke into Ganon’s secret lair, done away with the pig lord, and saved the princess. Good times.

 

I’m a nostalgia gamer. The first system I owned as a kid was an Atari, and the first games I ever played were Combat and Pong. After that, I was ushered into Nintendo fandom with the release of the Nintendo Entertainment System, or NES for short.

 

My fondest memories are with the original Legend of Zelda and Super Mario Bros. It was at that moment, as I tried to save the princess from another castle, or thwart the minions of Ganon, that I became a video game fanatic.

 

Nintendo Power - Nights Cover

 

I owned a stack of Nintendo Power Magazines! I eagerly awaited their arrival in the mail. I read every page, soaked in every strategy, and bought into each ad I came across. The Nintendo System cereal, featuring Mario and Link, was my breakfast! I wanted the Power Glove, the Nintendo Zapper, was introduced to Metroid, bought the Game Genie, and learned more about each and every game through this magazine! With Nintendo Power at my side, I conquered Super Mario Bros. 3, almost, but never did, beat Mike Tyson; he was so cheap.

 

Nintendo Power was also the magazine that encouraged me to draw. I started doodling Mario characters, the Koopa kids, Shy guys, Wart, Birdo, Mouser, King Koopa, Toad, the Princess. Each issue was filled with more pictures, new information to fuel my need to craft and create. As a child, Nintendo Power was my bible. Game purchases lived or died and games were beaten or left to find dust in the corner depending on what I read in those sacred pages.

 

Nintendo Power Zelda Ocarina Of Time Cover

 

As I grew up, I kept following Nintendo Power. I’d check it out here and there. But as I branched out to other systems, the tips and tricks in that once sacred magazine no longer held any relevance to me. Slowly, as I began seeking my information from Game Informer, GamePro, and other various video game magazines, Nintendo Power became a thing of my childhood.

 

I found out that on August 21, 2012, Nintendo decided not to renew their license, and that it would cease publication of the legendary magazine after 24 years. I hadn’t read the magazine since I was a kid, but something about the news made me ache a little bit. It was like hearing an old friend had died. You hadn’t seen them in years, never really spoke, but news of their passing still touches a place in your thoughts.

 

Here’s to Nintendo Power. I’ll miss you old friend. Thank you for the memories.

2 thoughts on “The Death Of Nintendo Power

    • Thank you. Hey, I think I remember that one.

      I totally forgot to mention that! This was before you could browse the net for codes and information. So there was no way to know unless you figured it out yourself, had a friend that knew, or had Nintendo Power.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*